Executive Fight Night Testing – Part 2

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The 9th Tokyo Executive Fight Night (EFN)  was held on May 31st at the Roppongi Grand Hyatt ballroom and was a massive success, raising 21 million for the Shine on Kids charity supporting kids with cancer. All the participants acquitted themselves well and showed the fruits of their labour.

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At the start of the EFN training camp we detailed a battery of physical assessments that we performed to identify some basic athletic traits amongst the competitors, and to see if these were predictive of success in the event. For a recap, read the previous blog post here:

Basic method of testing and comparing athletes – Executive Fight Night

The results of the testing were compared with the results of each individual bout (see below – the winner of each and the competitor who performed best in each individual characteristic are highlighted in bold). In some instances unfortunately we weren’t able to collect the data for a test for a particular athlete, and in other instances a particular physical characteristic was similar for both athletes.

Unfortunately, overall none of the physical characteristics were predictive of victory. Out of the 9 matches on the night, having a greater reach was associated with victory in 3, lower limb explosiveness in 3, eccentric utilisation ratio in 4, grip strength in 4, upper limb power in 4, and stamina in 4. Without a full statistical analysis there didn’t appear to be any trends in terms of combinations of different characteristics being predictive of victory either.

Obviously this is an amateur event with a wide range of experience levels, and while the participants are as evenly matched as possible, there is often a large discrepancy in both initial ability and change in ability throughout the training camp, and it is highly likely that boxing skill trumped athleticism in many of the bouts. It is also difficult to predict how individuals will respond to such an occasion, and the pressure of making their debut on such a big stage. This will also have likely influenced their results.

So whilst within this limited sample size we didn’t come out with any correlative data we will tighten up and re-run the testing process next year and run the results again.

Congratulations again to all the fighters as well as Ginja Ninjas and Shine on Kids for putting on another magnificent event.

Match 1

Name Reach Raw LL power Eccentric utilisation UL power Grip strength Stamina
Elana Gilbert 154.5 19.03 0.97 3.15 12 50
Idit Greenberg 160.5 16.33 1.09 2.5 19 45

Match 2

Name Reach Raw LL power Eccentric utilisation UL power Grip strength Stamina
Derek Simmons 177 15.02 0.92 5.25 39 52
Kerry Purcell 182 18.10 1.01 7 36 31

Match 3

Reach Raw LL power Eccentric utilisation UL power Grip strength Stamina
Christopher Orr 181.5 33.08 1.02 6 42 43
Daisuke Takashima 160 19.32 0.85 4.75 25 52

Match 4

Name Reach Raw LL power Eccentric utilisation UL power Grip strength Stamina
Karthi Indran 181 27.10 1.03 6.5 35 56
Shintaro Fukagawa 174.5 36.90 1.08 6.5 42 47

Match 5

Name Reach Raw LL power Eccentric utilisation UL power Grip strength Stamina
Jackie Alexander 160.5 13.41 0.99 2.25 20 43
Keiko Ono 163 26.60 1.29 4.1 12 38

Match 6

Name Reach Raw LL power Eccentric utilisation UL power Grip strength Stamina
Ben Roelandts 182.5 21.85 1.05 4.7 47 30
Vihn Tran 163 26.58 0.99 7 34 58

Match 7

Name Reach Raw LL power Eccentric utilisation UL power Grip strength Stamina
Daisuki Suga 177.5 34.03 1.19 8 42 52
Ben Runnacles 181.5 23.29 1.68 4.25 25 39

Match 8

Name Reach Raw LL power Eccentric utilisation UL power Grip strength Stamina
Colin Hilchey 180 29.83 1.20 6 27 35
Shimpei Noritake 168 50.00 0.95 38 59

Match 9

Name Reach Raw LL power Eccentric utilisation UL power Grip strength Stamina
Brendan Gallagher 180 34.87 1.21 8 42 52
Dominic Sumner 180 33.16 1.32 4.6 47 52

A full framework of physiological testing is featured in the science of striking, available in both hard-copy and kindle formats (https://www.amazon.com/Science-Striking-Comprehensive-Physical-Preparation/dp/1729586821/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1543575646&sr=8-2&keywords=The+Science+of+Striking+Sam+Gilbert)

#testing #assessment #thescienceofstriking #boxing #kickboxing #karate #shinkyokushin #kyokushin #executivefightnighttokyo #shineonkids #sok #EFN

About the author

Sam Gilbert

Sam Gilbert is a registered physiotherapist with the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) and certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS) with the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). He holds a bachelor’s degree in Physiotherapy from Latrobe university (Melbourne, Australia) and a master’s degree in Exercise Science (Strength and Conditioning) from Edith Cowan University (Perth, Australia).

A 3rd Dan black belt in Shinkyokushinkai Karate under the World Karate Organisation (WKO), Sam participated for over 20 years in full contact competition, winning multiple state and national titles, and culminating in a 4th place in the heavyweight division of the Shinkyokushinkai World Cup in 2009.

As the co-founder and clinical director of Club 360, the premier multi-disciplinary health and fitness center in Tokyo, Japan, Sam has combined his practical experience with an in-depth study of sports performance in relation to combat sports, and strives to help other combat athletes reach their full competitive potential, whilst at the same time decreasing injury risk and increasing competition and training potential.

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