AuthorSam Gilbert

Sam Gilbert is a registered physiotherapist with the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) and certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS) with the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). He holds a bachelor’s degree in Physiotherapy from Latrobe university (Melbourne, Australia) and a master’s degree in Exercise Science (Strength and Conditioning) from Edith Cowan University (Perth, Australia). A 3rd Dan black belt in Shinkyokushinkai Karate under the World Karate Organisation (WKO), Sam participated for over 20 years in full contact competition, winning multiple state and national titles, and culminating in a 4th place in the heavyweight division of the Shinkyokushinkai World Cup in 2009. As the co-founder and clinical director of Club 360, the premier multi-disciplinary health and fitness center in Tokyo, Japan, Sam has combined his practical experience with an in-depth study of sports performance in relation to combat sports, and strives to help other combat athletes reach their full competitive potential, whilst at the same time decreasing injury risk and increasing competition and training potential.

Applying the Acute vs Chronic Workload Ratio to Combat Sports: Part 3

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In the previous post we discussed calculation of training load using training minutes and RPE (). Whilst this works well as a base, it is possible to be even more detailed with our quantification of training load using some slightly more advanced methods. As discussed in the last post, compared to sports involving primarily cyclic activities (e.g. running), training load in combat sports training...

Applying the Acute vs Chronic Workload Ratio to Combat Sports: Part 2

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In the last post we discussed the importance of consistency in training loads, and introduced the acute vs chronic workload ratio (ACWR)(). Initially popular with team sports, the acute vs chronic ratio is now widely used in reference to resistance training and endurance sports. Whilst we don’t presently have any studies referencing its use in combat sports. It makes sense that regulation in...

Applying the Acute vs Chronic Ratio Workload to Combat Sports: Part 2

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In the last post we discussed the importance of consistency in training loads, and introduced the acute vs chronic workload ratio (ACWR)(). Initially popular with team sports, the acute vs chronic ratio is now widely used in reference to resistance training and endurance sports. Whilst we don’t presently have any studies referencing its use in combat sports. It makes sense that regulation in...

How to avoid overtraining and reduce the likelihood of injury – Applying the Acute vs Chronic Workload Ratio to Combat Sports: Part 1

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The Importance of Training Load In previous posts we have discussed goal setting for the year in advance (), setting up a testing battery to establish baseline levels of performance () and using the results of these processes to plan out the years training cycles (). Critical to the success of the training programme, both in terms of achieving the desired performance outcome and keeping an...

What Does Your Annual Training Plan Look Like? –  Part 4 – Case Study 2

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In the previous post we examined what an example annual training plan might look like for an Olympic boxing contender whose competition schedule is quite fixed, and whose training programme was focused on energy systems development (). In this post we take an example annual training plan for an athlete with less of a fixed competition schedule. This athlete is a male kickboxer, high in national...

5 exercises to improve forward pressure in fighting

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For many stand-up combat sports, the ability to move forward against the resistance of an opponent may is critical in the success of scoring a decision win, or optimising position for a knockout blow. Some fighting styles, Kyokushin Karate for an example, are scored heavily on the ability to move forward (or inversely not move back), and demonstrate aggression and control of a bout. The ability...

What Does Your Annual Training Plan Look Like? – Part 3 – Case Study 1

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In the previous post we looked at how an athlete might set up the first few training cycles of the year (). This post will look at the reassessment following competition. Competition day (Apr 28) This first competition for the season would be a test of the current training protocol. Improvements on performance in key assessments (push up test, maximal aerobic test) would be compared to...

What Does Your Annual Training Plan Look Like? – Part 2 – Case Study 1

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In the previous post we discussed the importance of having a training plan (), and basing this plan around 1) your goals for the year, 2) your current performance level based on anaylsis of the previous year’s competitions, and 3) your competition calendar for the year. In this post we will take look at the first of 2 case studies. As alluded to in the previous post, some athletes (usually those...

What Does Your Annual Training Plan Look Like? – Part 1

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So January has come and past, and hopefully we have gotten into the habit of writing the date with 2019 at the end! All athletes and fitness enthusiasts should be back into the full swing of their training regime, working towards their goals for the new year. But what does your training plan look like for the rest of the year? In the last blog series, we discussed the importance of goal setting...

What does your testing battery look like? Part 7 – Energy Systems Assessments

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In the previous few posts we have discussed the importance of performing testing for power and strength . In this last post of the series we discuss aerobic testing. Maximal Aerobic Speed There are numerous ways in which we can test for energy systems capacity, some of which require more resources (VO2 max, lactate testing etc). One simple test that can provide a useful base for energy systems...

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